Wellington Markets

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After a lot of procrastinating I finally made my way to the Wellington markets. I had been meaning to go for a long time but every time there was a reason for me to not to, too windy, rainy, cold, tired ect. But finally my partner and I made our way down.

I knew that parking would be difficult however I wasn’t quite prepared for what was ahead. . . .  There was a cue just to get into the car park. We ended up driving around near by, hoping and willing a park to come but atlas nope. So after a bit of googling we found a car park building nearish to the markets.

In all honesty it was a little lame. . . . There were a lot of takeaway food stalls, so next time I want to pop out for food I know where to look. The fruit and veg stalls were OK I guess. I think the stall holders go to a market in the next town over the day prior. So the lettuces ect have been sitting out for a while. So all in all I was a little bit disappointed  However to make the best of our time out I brought a bunch of cheapish fruits, nectarines, apricots, lemons, oranges, strawberries, oh and half a cabbage. But next time I think I will just travel to the next town over for the Saturday markets.

It was a beautiful sunny day so my partner and I sat down by the harbor to eat our strawberries. Which was delightful!

Also below are bonus photo’s of my cats being happy little beans after I got home from the markets.

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Swedish Tea Ring

 

This is a recipe that my partners mother taught me how to make. It is commonly served at family gatherings and is quickly gobbled up. It is very similar to cinnamon scrolls, but always feels more rewarding, as it’s my partners favourite I think they agree.

As we had family coming around for lunch I decided to whip this up. The recipe that I used was this one, this recipe isn’t the one that my partners mum uses as hers came with her bread maker and from memory it is slightly different. However it works just fine. If you click on the link above that will tell you how to make it if you have a bread maker. The recipe that I have written here is the adaptation if you don’t have one. Personally I have a bread maker but if it’s a warm day I can’t resist making breads by hand!

Start by heating the milk to luke warm (important that it’s luke warm, too hot and it kills the yeast, to cold and it doesn’t activate it). Then add the yeast and sugar to the milk. The recipe in the link calls for 3/4 tsp of yeast but I added a touch over 1 tsp as it just didn’t seem like enough. Leave for 10 mins or so until the yeast has created a layer of bubbles on the milk. This step is quite important as it tells you if your yeast is active.

Now add your melted butter and egg to the milk and whisk up, as shown in the photo below.

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I make any breads/ yeast dough’s on the bench. I am not quite sure why, apart from the fact that my dad insisted that it’s the best way. I presume it’s because my Nana insisted that it was the way to go . . . So I tipped the flour onto the bench and created a well and poured the liquid mixture into the well.

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Mix until it forms a dough and knead until the dough bounces back when pressed with thumb. At this stage I felt like the recipe called for far to much flour and I was never going to fully incorporate. However yeast dough’s call for patience, so I continued kneading until eventually it came together! As you can see in the photo below.

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Now it’s time to rest the dough. I am not going to lie and say this was a super smooth process where I left it for two hours and bam it had doubled in size. What happened what I left it for an hour in a warm spot covered by a glad wrap and came back to find it hadn’t grown. At all. Concerned I moved it to another spot. Half hour later it hadn’t grown at all. At this stage I was convinced that the yeast was dead and it wasn’t going to rise. After a bit of googling I found out that rich yeast dough’s i.e dough’s with egg, sugar and butter may take longer to rise. As I had people coming in an hour I didn’t have time so I turned my warmer draw on, covered the dough with a damp tea towel (to stop the dough from drying out) and hoped it would rise. Thankfully 50mins later it had risen, fewf!

So if you like me are finding that your dough isn’t rising put it into your warming draw or oven at its lowest temp and let it rise.

Roll the dough out as below, it was roughly 0.5cm thick.

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Spread the dough in melted butter. Mix cinnamon and brown sugar and sprinkle evenly over. Roll the dough, into one long sausage.

Transfer to a tray lined with baking paper. Bring the two ends together, linking them together the best that you can, to for one ring.

Now get a pair of kitchen scissors and cut the dough ever 2cm along. Do not cut all the way through to the inner part of the circle, as you want a tab to hold it together. Now spread the segments apart, like below. Leave to rise in the warming draw for another hour or so.

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Pop into the oven and viola! You will notice that some of the butter and sugar mixture will ooze out, while it’s still warm (not hot!) quickly mop it up with a piece of the ring, delish!

Near the end  I got into a bit of a rush and forgot to take many photo’s so please excuse that. I will update this post when I make it again. Also there isn’t a photo of the finished tea ring as it was eaten to quickly. I was hoping to at least get a photo of the last two pieces but my partner got midnight munchies and it was gone. . . . .

For the Dough:

For the Filling:

  • 2 tablespoons butter, softened
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar

Instructions:

 

Start by heating the milk to luke warm (important that it’s luke warm, too hot and it kills the yeast, to cold and it doesn’t activate it). Then add the yeast and sugar to the milk. Leave for 10 mins or so until the yeast has created a layer of bubbles on the milk. This step is quite important as it tells you if your yeast is active.

Now add your melted butter and egg to the milk and whisk up, as shown in the photo below.

Tip the flour onto the bench and create a well and pour the liquid mixture into the well. Mix until it forms a dough and knead.

Cover and leave in a warm place for a few hours, to double in size.

Once doubled in size roll out into a rectangle, about 0.5cm thick.

Spread the dough in melted butter. Mix cinnamon and brown sugar and sprinkle evenly over. Roll the dough, into one long sausage

Transfer to a tray lined with baking paper. Bring the two ends together, linking them together the best that you can, to for one ring.

Now get a pair of kitchen scissors and cut the dough ever 2cm along. Do not cut all the way through to the inner part of the circle, as you want a tab to hold it together. Now spread the segments apart, like below. Leave to rise in the warming draw for another hour or so.

Once risen again, pop into an oven at 180 deg C for 10mins or until golden brown.

Potato Rosti

potato-rosti

I used to make this breakfast recipe quite often but for some reason I haven’t made it for the past few years. So I decided to whip it up for brunch on new years day!

Serves 2

  • Hollandaise Sauce 
  • Tomato Relish 
  • 2 medium potatoes
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 onion – brown
  • Crispy bacon – or in my case leftover Christmas ham
  • 2 eggs
  • optional – 1 extra egg – see note

Grate the potato (this is much easier if you have a food processor, but do what works for you). Then grab a handful of potato and squeeze it over the sink to drain all of the water. Repeat this process until all the excess water is drained. Then grate the onion and squeeze to drain all the excess water. Place the onion and potato into a bowl. Dice garlic and add to bowl.

To form the rosti take roughly a tablespoon of the potato mixture roll into a ball and flatten in the palm of your hand until roughly 0.5cm thick

You can cook the rosti either in the oven or in the pan. Either way the process is roughly the same. If in the oven place the uncooked rosti onto a baking tray and drizzle with oil. Then bake at 200deg Celsius, once one side is brown flip to brown the other.

If in the pan, heat pan on medium to high heat and add a tablespoon of oil. Fill the pan with rosti, flipping once golden brown.

Once cooked assemble by alternating rosti with tomato relish. Top with egg and hollandaise sauce.

 

NOTE: if you are finding that the rosti are falling apart when you flip them you can add one egg to the mixture to help bind the potato.

 

Quick Tomato Relish

This is a quick tomato relish that can be whipped up in 15mins and makes roughly 2 cups. I use it mostly on my potato rosti but it can be used for pretty much anything! What I normally do is pop down to the weekend markets. Picking up a bag of super cheap, super ripe tomatoes to use.

1/2 Red Onion

2-3 Garlic cloves

1/2 red chili

1/4 tsp Mustard seeds

2 Tbsp Olive oil

5 medium tomatoes

2.5 Tbsp balsamic vinegar.

Finely slice the red onions, garlic cloves and chilli. Place into a small pot with olive oil to soften the onions. Stir them only occasionally letting them stick to the bottom on the pot and even slightly burn. It adds a yummy flavor to the relish!

Quarter the tomatoes and add to the pot, along with the balsamic vinegar. Cook over medium heat for 5-10mins until the tomatoes have begun to break down.

Once the chutney is finished give it a quick taste. If it tastes, too acidic or too spicy add a pinch of sugar. As that will even the flavors out.

Store in a sterilized jar in the fridge. Use within roughly one week.

 

Hollandaise Sauce

This is the recipe that I use for Hollandaise sauce. In all honesty I can’t remember where I found it! What I do know is that is contains cream, and I believe that Hollandaise sauce with cream is infinitely better!

This recipe can be made in a bowl in the microwave. If you do cook it in the microwave, cook it the same way but just pop it in 10 seconds at a time and stir in between each turn. because microwaves have uneven heat there is a chance that some small parts of the egg may begin to cook. If this happens just vigorously mix the sauce for a minute or two and it pretty much always breaks down the cooked egg for me.

50 grams butter

2 egg yolks

1 TBsp lemon juice or vinegar

1/4 Cup cream

Salt – to taste

a pinch of cayenne pepper

In a double boiler melt butter over low heat. Then add the, egg yolks, lemon juice and cream. Continue heating over low heat until it begins to thicken.

The sauce is ready once it is the thickness of double cream. Once done stir in salt (to taste) and add a pinch of cayenne pepper.
Which sounds kinda odd I know but the cayenne pepper isn’t there to make it spicy. Rather is just enough to give it a tang!